The Storms of Deliverance #bookreview

First sentence: So here he was, stuck in the middle lane and obviously very ill.

About the story: When ex-Atlanta Braves baseball star, Johnson, wakes up, it’s 2008, and he’s in someone else’s car, wearing someone else’s clothes on a highway. His last clear memory was in 1981. As Johnson struggles to get his memory back, he wonders if it’s amnesia, or something deeper.

My thoughts: The Storms of Deliverance is a decent story of redemption. Slow paced a large chunk of the time, but still a decent, easy read. When we begin our adventure, Johnson does what I’m sure all of us would do when we wake up somewhere with zero recollection of how we got there: he tries to figure out exactly what happened. All Johnson knows is he doesn’t live in Atlanta, but in Buffalo. Along with a strange attire and a strange car, Johnson is also in a strange year. After we join Johnson in the confusion, we eventually hop back into 1981. We learn about Johnson’s friends, wife, his alcohol addiction.

There were a few spots in the story where I noticed isn’t very realistic. For instance, in 2008, he knows what a caller ID is; however, in 1981, there is no such invention as a caller ID. My thought was that if Johnson’s memory is completely blank for that amount of time, then he wouldn’t know about caller ID. That didn’t arise until around 1988. The story’s flashback doesn’t reach that far. There were other points, but I won’t dwell on them.

I was more interested in the 2008 timeline. Reading about the past was often tedious, and I began losing interest, but by then, it was the present day again.

The good thing about the book in its entirety is that it gets you thinking. There is a strong message behind The Storms of Deliverance. It was a good debut novel.

My rating: 4 out of 5 stars

Does it interest you? Buy it here!

*For more reviews, visit: Angela Kay’s Books*

A little bit about the author:

LLarry Higdonarry Higdon lives in metropolitan Atlanta. Most recently, he has worked as an elementary school counselor with kindergarten and first-graders. He is a registered play therapist and a lawyer. This is his debut novel.

“The Murder of Manny Grimes”

Who loves a good mystery? I know I do! I love reading them, I love watching them, I love writing them! I’ve always written mysteries…most were short stories from a young girl, which you probably NEVER will read. They are tucked and locked away in a file that reads if opened, self-destruct. Just kidding…well, sort of.

Anyway, I wanted to announce the release of “The Murder of Manny Grimes” on the Amazon and Barnes and Noble websites.  Help this freshly indie author out by spreading the word. Tell your mystery-loving friends to buy!

The eBook version is only $4.99 and the paperback is $14.95. I urge you to at least get an electronic copy…it’s cheap! Now, who doesn’t like cheap?

OR, if you want a signed copy, fill out the order form below! I’ll give you a signed copy of the paperback for just $15, taxes and shipping included!

So, tell your friends! Christmas is just around the corner! It’d make an awesome Christmas gift for one of your mystery-loving friends (and family).

And I want to know what you think, so feel free to leave a review! Of course, more five stars are always welcome!

~Angela

Send me a message below that you want to order a signed copy!

White is the Coldest Colour #BookReview

  • File Size: 728 KBWhite is the Coldest Colour: A gripping dark psychological suspense thriller (Re-edited edition) (Dr David Galbraith Book 1) by [Nicholl, John]
  • Print Length: 286 pages
  • Publication Date: May 1, 2015
  • Sold by:Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00VR8X45W
  • Format:  Kindle, Paperback, Audible
  • Goodreads
  • Genres: Psychological Thriller

From the author:
White is the coldest colour is entirely fictional, but draws on my experiences as a police officer, child protection social worker, manager and trainer. During my career I was faced with case after case that left me incredulous as to the harm sexual predators chose to inflict on their victims. The book reflects that reality.

The story is set in 1992, a more naïve time when many found it extremely difficult to believe that a significant number of adults posed a serious risk to children.

The book includes content that some readers may find upsetting from the start.

It is dedicated to survivors everywhere.

Review:
White is the Coldest Colour is a gripping, disturbing narrative of child abuse. Dr. Galbraith is a child predator and a character that appear so real within the pages of the story, it’s terrifying. The events take place in the early nineties, where, in the author’s words, many find it difficult to believe that children could be put at risk of adults.

A story such as this is one that can both make you want to throw the book across the room, yet can’t let you go. The scenes are welded beautifully, each as strong as the next. John Nicholl terrifyingly describes what’s happening in such vivid detail, it tugs at your heartstrings. The first chapter alone is one that would make you want to put the book down because you’re in the mind of a pedophile. However, it’s an essential part of the story, one that must be included. The next few chapters show the truth of how a sexual predator appears to the general public.

The characters, primary and secondary, stood out and you really feel for them. You get mad at them, but you can’t help but love them. The only one you don’t love are the ones doing the bad things, but they blossomed in the writing.

While reading novels based on child abuse is not my choice of an enjoyable read, I found that reading it helps raise awareness that anyone, even a well-liked child psychologist, married with children, could be a sexual predator. A lot of parents still, even to this day, believe that their children are safe. But the truth is, this is a dark world in which we live. And White is the Coldest Colour does well in reminding us of that.

The author, John Nicholl is a former police officer and child protection social worker, so he knows his stuff. He wrote this book to help his readers realize the pain and suffering children go through by sexual predators.

I recommend White is the Coldest Colour because as hard of a read it was, the story moved forward, the scenes and characters were strong, and it raised important issues, one that people just don’t want to discuss. I can only imagine how hard it is to write a book such as this one, especially when it’s based on the things you’ve seen in your career. I truly look forward to seeing more from Mr. Nicholl.

Overall Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

John Nicholl

John Nicholl’s debut novel: White is the coldest colour, a chilling dark psychological suspense thriller, draws on the author’s experiences as a police officer and child protection social worker. The novel entered the Amazon UK top 100 bestsellers chart after just 15 days, and became one of the 25 most read books on Kindle, reaching # 1 in British Detectives and Vigilante Justice. It also reached # 1 in British Detectives and Psychological Thrillers in France, # 1 in British Detectives and Psychological & Suspense in Spain, and # 1 in British Detectives and International Mysteries and Crime in Australia, where it reached # 10 of all books in the Kindle store. The gripping sequel: When evil calls your name, was published on the 31st of December 2015, and quickly reached # 1 in Biographies and Memoirs of Women in the UK, # 1 in Biographies and Memoirs of Criminals and International Mysteries and Crime in Australia, and # 1 in Violence in Society in the USA.

World-Mart by @LeighMLane #BookReview

  • Title: World-MartWorld Mart Image
  • Author: Leigh M. Lane
  • File Size: 683KB
  • Print Length: 297
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1514105799
  • Publisher: Cerebral Books
  • Publication Date: October 13, 2011
  • Sold by Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005VTN1OC
  • Format: Kindle, Paperback
  • Goodreads
  • Genres: Dystopian Future, Science Fiction

From the author

I wrote this novel in response to the death of Kurt Vonnegut Jr., determined to create not only a dystopia for modern times, but a payment of homage to the genre. Tucked throughout the work, you’ll find allusions to numerous greats of science fiction past, hints to a future world that could easily come to pass, and subtle references to the death of an important and meaningful literary era.

World-Mart follows the classic dystopian trope, and as such, I recommend it to those who enjoyed Vonnegut’s Cat’s Cradle, Orwell’s 1984, and similar works.

World-Mart is the first in a trilogy, and a chilling story of class segregation, failing energy supplies, food shortages, antibiotic resistant viruses and governmental control over every action and choice made in life. With the way the world seems to be going these days, World-Mart gives a glimpse of a very possible, and frightening, future. It seemed all too real to me.

It’s slow-moving, however, I didn’t mind it because it was at the same time, a quick read. The scenes were put together beautifully. Each character held their own and was very rounded and believable. I enjoyed getting to know them and emphasized with most.

Before agreeing to read the book for a review, I read a review that stated this novel was just a commentary of the author’s rants on the success of businesses, loathing of America, etcetera. After reading, I disagree with that review. World-Mart brings me to mind of The Hunger Games, but better put together, and more realistic. And I enjoyed World-Mart a hundred percent more. I believe that it would make a good Lifetime series or even a mini-series. At the very least, I wouldn’t be too surprised should high school teachers one day decide to have their class read and study its contents for Literature. I enjoyed the ending, which saddened me, but at the same time left me wanting for more.

Still, although the story itself was five stars, there were some imperfections. There was quite a lot of telling, rather than showing, which at times put me off from reading. There were a few misspells and grammatical errors.

Leigh M. Lane followed up with Aftermath: Beyond World-Mart and its prequel, The Private Sector, both of which I would be eager to read.

Overall rate: 4 out of 5 stars.

Leigh M. Lane

“In addition to writing dark speculative fiction for over twenty-five

years, Leigh M. Lane has dabbled in fine arts, earned a black belt in karate, and sung lead and backup vocals for bands ranging from classic rock to the blues. She currently lives in the dusty outskirts of Sin City with her husband, an editor and educator, and one very spoiled cat.

Her published works include traditional Gothic horror novel Finding Poe; the World-Mart trilogy, a dystopian tribute to Orwell, Serling, and Vonnegut; and the dark allegorical tale, Myths of Gods.

Leigh also writes urban and mainstream horror as Lisa Lane: http://www.amazon.com/Lisa-Lane/e/B002BMI5S4.”

Connect with Leigh on her website.
http://www.cerebralwriter.com.

© Copyright-All rights reserved by angelakaysbooks.wordpress.com 2016

The Twins: A Psychological Review

  • Title:  The Twins: A Psychological Thriller Book 1the-twins-r-g-miller
  • Author: R.G. Miller
  • File Size: 525KB
  • Print Length: 227
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1514105799
  •  Publisher: R.G. Miller
  • Publication Date: November 21, 2015
  • Sold by Amazon Digital Services LLC
  •  Language: English
  • ASIN: B018BREYFK
  • Formats:  Kindle, Paperback
  • Goodreads
  • Genres: Psychological Thriller

From the author:

A Gritty Suspense Thriller about innocence lost and darkness gained…What if two thirteen-year-old sisters, who were identical twins; sisters who’d came from an affluent family; twin sisters whose parents had shielded them from all the ugliness of the world; identical twins who’d shared that unique twin consciousness, were suddenly forced to watch the unthinkable: the torture and murder of their parents? What if three years later, these identical twin sisters go on an unrelenting quest for vengeance? This was the fate of 13-year-old Stacey and Jannifer McHill, identical twins who’d survived a living nightmare, but in doing so…they’ve become a living nightmare.

On their 13th birthday, identical twins Stacey and Jannifer McHill had to witness the worse thing imaginable: the brutal murder of their parents. Stepping into the shoes of the twins, it leaves you haunted by the end of the first chapter. As the story progresses three years later, we find that Detective Isis Williams, who is battling a serious anger problem, is hunting the twins who are on a murderous rampage. This is a story where we already know who did it. We just need to figure out the motive behind the heinous deeds.

The narrative tone throughout the story doesn’t seem as dark as it should be based on the story. The tone leaves one with the feel of a story intended for a slightly younger reader in spite of the sex, language and crime scenes. The twin girls, in the beginning, appear to be younger than 13, but I’m able to look past the youthfulness because on their birthday, they should be excited and happy.

However, according to the book’s description, the twin’s lives have always been perfect. Without reading the blurb, I see the twins as just being normally happy, and at the most, eight years old, rather than 13. We don’t know until near the end that the twins were shielded from a painful life.

When we meet Detective Williams, we find that she is a brutally angry woman. We even see her fighting a rookie in her first scene, which seems odd for a woman in her rank in a real world setting. I did enjoy the brief banter she and her new partner exchanged when they first met. And as Detective Williams progresses, her brutal anger turns to dedication of finding the killers.

My main issue with the story is that there were very few breaks in the scenes, if any. It could be the twin’s perspective, then Detective Williams, then someone else in one paragraph. This caused me to reread the scenes a few times to grasp which scene I should be focusing on at which time. Especially since the switches were so quick in the paragraph. There were also some editing errors that threw me off.

We quickly see how brutal, how dark, how gritty the crimes are. The crime scenes bring me to mind of CSI, or even Saw. That being said, a few word changes here and there would have made the narrative more intense. There was a lot of telling, rather than showing.

As someone who has been obsessed as of late reading literature about serial killings, and has always loved reading about identical twins, I thought the idea of this book was stellar. A little cleaning up, it would be that. If you enjoy movies like Saw, then you’ll probably want to give R.G. Miller’s debut novel, “The Twins” a try.

 
Overall Rate: 3 out of 5 stars

About R.G. Miller

Author R.G. Miller image“R.G.Miller, who was born in Brooklyn, N.Y. He’s an avid reader. His favorite subject is Abnormal Psychology. He enjoys classic R&B and Rock. He’s the grandfather of three, and he enjoys picking up a mike and singing a tune or two.

R.G.Miller spent three years working on his trilogy.”If you’re a fan of CSI, Criminal Minds, or Law and Order, The Twins: A Psychological suspense thriller is the book for you.”

The Twins: A Psychological Thriller is R.G.Miller’s first novel.”

Connect with R.G. on his Facebook page.

https://www.facebook.com/r.g.millerthetwins/


Angela Kay, Author imageBook Review

by Angela Kay.

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