Unelmoija: The Mindshifter #bookreview #elleboca

First sentence: As I woke up in the strange room I remembered I had a free morning without any tests, class assignments or chores.

About the story: Amy’s gone away to Miami Beach for a girls’ weekend with her friends Krissa and Lilly. But, when Lilly vanishes, it’s up to Amy and Krissa to find her. In doing so, they stumble upon a slaver’s scheme. During their heroics, they end up meeting an unexpected ally. As they realize the seriousness of Lilly’s fate, Amy and gang race against time before their friend is gone for good.

My thoughts: Unelmoija: The Mindshifter is book number two of the Weeia series, and it’s a pretty good one, story-wise. The writing was fast-paced, like all the other novels I’ve read of Elle Boca. Amy’s character has grown fictional-wise and writing-wise, which is a good thing. However, there were some points in the story where I thought she was being a bit strange. I won’t mention it in case of spoilers.

In the first book, The Dreamshifter, I was curious about the kidnappings of Amy and her sister before the story opened. It was brought to our attention out of the blue, never really discussed, except in passing. This time around, we do get to find out where Amy’s sister has been for the past two years, though I still felt something was missing in the story. My main issue with the kidnapping subplot is that the ordeal was treated as if it were perfectly normal for someone to be kidnapped and show up years later. There weren’t enough tears, especially where Amy was concerned. I also wondered, “why did Kat not attempt to reach out to her family?”

Additionally, when they’re searching for their missing friend, Krissa’s ability suddenly develops and she forgets that something serious is going on and starts acting giddy. Granted, it’s rare for her age for abilities to manifest, but her friend is in danger. If it were me, I wouldn’t be too focused on receiving a special ability until my friend was safe.

I like how Amy grew from not having a clue about what Weeia is, to a young woman who embraces who she is, and will use her sacred ability to save someone, no matter the cost to her.

This is only Elle Boca’s second book and I believe she’s still getting her feet wet, finding her voice. While I am enjoying learning about Amy and her abilities, I prefer the Weeia Marshalls series the most. I recommend for readers who enjoy urban fantasy and a fun, light read.

My rating: 3 out of 5 stars

Does it interest you? Buy it here!

*For more reviews, visit: Angela Kay’s Books*

A little bit about the author: Elle is the author of the Weeia urban fantasy series about superhumans. The Unelmoija series is set in Miami. In the Garden of Weeia, a novella, is set in Portland, Maine, and her newest Marshals Series is set in Paris, France. Growing up the only child of a monkey mother and a rabbit father she learned to keep herself entertained and spend time reading.

Disconnected #bookreview @nick_m_lloyd

  • Title: Disconnected
  • Author: Nick M. Lloyd
  • Print Length: 465
  • Publication Date: March 27, 2017
  • Sold by Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • Formats:  Kindle, Paperback
  • Goodreads
  • Genres: Science Fiction, Fantasy

This was definitely an interesting book. It wasn’t what I expected by any means. Asha Kharjal is a political advisor who knows how to rewire people’s subconscious and he’ll stop at nothing to so. He’s not the villain in the book. Asha attempts to do good with his skills, but like any decent story, he falls into hot water.

This is a very technical story, much like the writings of Michael Crichton. Since I don’t have a technical mind, I couldn’t grasp a good deal of it. There wasn’t a lot of explanation for the technical terms so it would throw me off. I did reading about enjoy skein space. It kind of reminds me of Assassin’s Creed’s animus. Skein space is where Asha and his “students” enter to connect to another person’s core and tap whatever message they want in order to sway the subjects to do what was needed. I would have enjoyed the skein space even more if the author had included in the beginning of the book what each color meant, whether black is for love or hate and so on. It is briefly mentioned, however, it wouldn’t have been easy to find the page to remind ourselves what exactly the colors meant.

Since it wasn’t always easy for me to grasp the technicality of the book, I focused more on the characters. They were written extremely well and with, for the most part, enough personality to fly right out of the pages. Polly seemed to have bounced around wildly and could have been toned down just a bit. I enjoyed the conflict with Sarah and Marcus, but Marcus’ mother (Polly) made me care less about Sarah and Marcus’ past relationship. Polly was too intrusive where they were concerned. It took me away from the actual plot.

The world building was great. Anytime they found themselves in the Congo, I felt I was right there with them. I could hear the sounds, see the sights. I think it was my favorite part of the story. And the Congo pieces were only subplots.

For the most part, Disconnected is a slow read. It’s only because of the technical pieces of the story, but it starts running when you’re about a quarter of a way through. The danger that danced around in the earlier pages is dialed up.

Overall Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

*For more book reviews, click here.*

About the Author
Nick Lloyd

Nick Lloyd is an independent author, living in London.

He loves writing stories with moral uncertainty, where a reader could take the side of one (or more) protagonists in conflict.

http://www.nickmlloyd.com

His first novel – Emergence – received very strong feedback on its debut in October 2014.

“thought-provoking science fiction thriller encompassing a variety of philosophical and moral dilemmas” – SF Signal Interview (Feb 2015) http://www.sfsignal.com/archives/2015/02/

Emergence (***** Amazon 5 Stars *****)

Earth is being scrutinised by an alien civilisation who maintain their dominance across the galaxy through manipulation of probability. Among the aliens, whole religions have sprung up related to interpretation of this apparent control of ‘luck’. On Earth, a single human starts the transformation to allow them a measure of control themselves…

Broken Wizard #bookreview

  • Title: Broken Wizard
  • Author: Jeff Bardwell
  • Print Length: 438
  • Publisher: Twigboat Press
  • Publication Date: April 6, 2017
  • Sold by Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • Formats:  Kindle
  • Goodreads
  • Genres: Science Fiction, Fantasy

Synopsis

The wizard purge is in full swing. Sorcery is illegal in the modern, steam-powered Iron Empire. The Magistrate’s Black Guards hunt the uncivilized mages using mechanized armor and mysterious, clockwork weapons. The guards deliver their prisoners to the Butcher, Captain Vice. All wizards are tortured and executed as traitors to the state . . . with one exception.

That exception is Devin, an outbreak mage, and ex-artificer, a prince of machinery. The Magistrate exiles the youth over Vice’s protests to the wild kingdom of wizards and dragons. Devin only knows gears and springs, but his savage magic offers salvation if he can tame it. The exile must learn to harness his dangerous, new powers before the Butcher tracks him down to finish the job.

Follow Devin’s quest in Book One* of The Artifice Mage Saga. Join the fantasy steampunk brawl of metal vs. magic where sorcery is bloody, science is greasy, and nobody’s hands are clean.

My Review

When I first began this book, there were so many run-on sentences, I had a hard time reading the first few chapters. However, I happened to notice on Amazon, that author Jeff Bardwell uploaded a newer version than the one I originally had. So, I downloaded that version, and once I began to reread the first few pages, I could tell a major difference in writing.

I have to say that the story line itself held promise, but seemed to drag. The main character, Devin, is exiled in the beginning and he soon realizes that he’s a mage. He goes on a quest in search of someone who can teach him how to control his magic. There wasn’t a lot of action as I had hoped. Most of the storytelling seemed to be based on the characters’ thoughts which put me off. The paragraphs were also so lengthy. I found myself rereading several times to grasp what was happening, which took me longer than normal to finish.

I loved the imagery, though. When reading a fantasy story, I need to be able to picture the background. The world was built beautifully and had great word choices. However, I wasn’t too crazy about the poetic in the dialogue. It was too flowery than it needed to be when the book appeared to be full of darkness and evil. I get that the purpose was to fit the early times the story was set in. However, it just didn’t work for me.

Jeffrey Bardwell definitely had a great idea of a story full of mages and sorcery. Despite the hard editing done (and yes, I definitely could see the wonderful changes he had made), I rate this a three star. I didn’t hate the book but I didn’t love it either. I believe breaking up a few of the longer paragraphs, cleaning up the characters’ speech and adding a few action scenes here and there would have made a world of difference. It was a good effort. With more time, I believe this author could bring out more four or five stars to his writings. He has a good imagination.

Overall Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

*For more book reviews, click here.*

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